Ascda Ashley Lowe 'Tangerine'

 

Shows > Show Marshall's Guide for Societies

 

Show Marshall's Guide for Societies

1. Before the Show or meeting

Read the show schedule to ensure that it makes sense, or ask one of the Judges or the Registrar for help if necessary.

2. Monthly meetings

  1. Supervise setting-up of adequate benching space.
  2. Provide plant book-in system. e.g. forms.
  3. Organize class markers on benches.
  4. Check that all plants are correctly benched for their particular class and relocate if necessary.
  5. Accompany the judges and ensure that all place winners are noted, according to your system.
  6. Supervise the collection and collation of Popular Votes.
  7. Announce Popular Vote winners.
  8. Provide a list of members eligible for presentation of Incentive awards.
  9. Ensure that all new members are provided with benching codes.

3. At the Show before judging commences

  1. Check that plants are disease free, and without insect infestations.
  2. Ensure that all exhibits are accessible to the judges.
  3. Check that exhibits are not tied on any part of the flower including the ovaries. ( That part of the flower which swells when the flower is pollinated.) Ask the exhibitor to retie the spike correctly.
  4. Check that the plants are benched in the correct classes - if uncertain ask for help from the judges before judging starts.

4. During Judging

  1. Clear the show area of all unnecessary people. The only ones left should be the Show Marshal and the recorder/s
  2. Ensure that all the judges have a schedule.
  3. Become familiar with the society's 'Conditions of Show' and interpret those conditions within the Schedule. Be ready with accurate information for the judges in relation to the schedule, or confidently advise the judges to use their own discretion.
  4. Advise the Judges whether or not plants can be moved between classes or if plants are to be disqualified if entered in the wrong class.
  5. Advise the Judges if you want prizes given, even if they consider no plant worthy of a prize.
  6. Untie any supporting hardware when requested by the judges.
  7. Advice the Judges early if the society requires them to sign cards.
  8. Discussions that the judges may have must not be repeated to anyone else.
  9. Accompany the judges and indicate the various plants, for judging in each class on the bench as well as in displays.
  10. Supervise the placing of ribbons for 1st and 2nd placings.
  11. Supervise the placing of sashes for Champions.
  12. Supervise the notation of class placings and collate, to determine the most successful exhibitors in Open Novice and Junior.
  13. Supervise the completion.

5. The schedule

  1. All orchids should have somewhere to go.
  2. The schedule should be based on what members grow.
  3. The conditions should cover the necessaries
    • Benching times
    • Judging times
    • Closing times
    • Other conditions suggestions under 19 below.

6. Check that the plants are disease free, and without insect infestations

Disease and plant pests (like scale and mealy bugs) can be transferred from plant to plant by insects. Plants should be in show condition. Judges may disqualify sick or pest infested plants . They may also recommend that these plants are removed from the bench. It is the Show Marshals responsibility to check all plants and have offending plants removed before judging begins, as well as on the advice /request of the judges.

7. Ensure that all exhibits are accessible to the judges

Judges cannot judge plants which they cannot see. Judges need to determine the condition of the flowers and whether any are missing.

8. Flower Supports

Check that exhibits are not supported by ties, on any part of the flower, including the ovaries. (The ovaries are that part of the flower that swells when the flower is pollinated.) Ask the exhibitor to retie the spike correctly. This is a specific requirement and is separate from Item 9. It is particularly important to check Paphiopedilums, as this is the one genus that is most often in breach of this rule.

9. Check that the plants are in the correct Classes

  • Check the colours - check that the plants have been entered into the correct colour classes
  • Check the sizes of the flowers against the schedule. All of the flowers should be less than the maximum for that class on the schedule.
  • Check the style of flower - classical - novelty - ?? Influence.
  • Check the Genera etc.
  • In species classes check the native location.

10. Clear the show area

The judges must be able to freely discuss the exhibits without fear of being misquoted. In the past , comments made by judges have been used out of context. It is far better that exhibitors are not within hearing distance. Exhibitors should not approach the judges before or during judging. Most judges are happy to explain the judging after judging is finished. Judges who are not judging the show should not be asked, nor should they pass comment, on the judging results.

11. Ensure that all judges have a schedule.

12. Be familiar with the specific Conditions of Show and how they are interpreted in the Schedule, so you are able to advise your judges, or tell them when it is up to their discretion

It is the Show Marshal who should know what the Society wanted when drafting the schedule. In many cases there is conflict between the judging rules and/or normal practice, and other times when judges are confused by 'too little information'. Judges need to be able to make informed decisions according to the schedule, or permitted to freely interpret the schedule.

13. Movement of plants between classes

It does not matter whether judges can or cannot move plants between classes, the Society should decide by way of their 'Show Conditions' and their Schedule. It should be remembered that it can make the judging take longer if the judges need to move plants and have to re-judge some classes. It is also better for members, especially new members , if all plants are judged, and not some disqualified for being incorrectly benched. It is a matter for the society; however the judges must be advised of changes to conditions/schedules.

14. Advise the Judges if you want prizes given even if they consider that there is no plant worthy of a prize

Sometimes in a class there are plants that are damaged or of poor quality. If the exhibitor is told that their plants were not worthy of a prize , they may not bring plants next time. On the other hand , poor plants may reflect badly on the society. Some societies want prizes given no matter the quality while others are happy to not give prizes. Neither of these approaches is right or wrong. Some societies allow second or third prizes with no firsts, however this should be avoided. It does not make sense to give a second without a first.

15. Untie any supporting hardware at the request of the judges

The judges need to be able to determine if a plant spike is strong enough to hold its flowers. Judges also prefer not to disqualify plants which are tied incorrectly. It is the Show Marshals responsibility to untie the plants and not the judges.

16. Advise the Judges early if the society has any special requirements

Advise the Judges early if the society needs the m to sign place cards Advise the judges on arrival of any thing that the Society requires them to do. i.e. sign place cards, judge foliage plants, judge floral art, judge paintings etc. Especially advise the Judges if there is a time limitation for completion of judging, shopping centre closing times or public entry restrictions etc.

17. Conversation between judges overheard by marshals during judging, must remain confidential

The judges must be able to freely discuss the exhibits without fear of being misquoted or attacked by unsuccessful exhibitors following judging Exhibitors should not approach the judges before or during judging. Most judges are happy to explain the judging after judging is finished. Judges who are not judging the show should not be asked, nor should they pass comment on the judging results.

18. Development of a schedule for a show or monthly meeting competition

18.1. Perpetual trophies in memory of ..

These are often given with a request that they are for a specific class. If accepted it should be on the understanding that the society can allocate it to a different class after say 5 years. You do not want to have the schedule restricted indefinitely.

18.2. Champions

There are different ways to allow for Grand Champion

  1. Grand Champion and Reserve Champion
  2. Best in Show, Grand Champion Hybrid and Grand Champion Species .
  3. Grand Champion, Best Hybrid, Best Species

Each section or group of classes should be eligible for a champion. More than one section can contribute to a single champion.

Note: Once the grand champion is chosen then the plant which came second in the section the champion was from, is eligible for consideration for the Reserve Champion. This plant should be chosen from the plants that were 1st in their class and the plant which came second in the class that the Grand Champion was from.

  • Champion Native Species is eligible for nomination for the Ira Butler Award .
  • Champion Native Hybrid is eligible for nomination for the Bill Murdoch Award

There also can be prizes for Best Orchid, where there is no specific class. These prizes can be for:

  • Best Specimen
    Some societies do not have classes for specimen orchids and only have one prize for the whole show.
  • Best Australasian Orchid Hybrid
    This plant would be eligible for nomination for the Hermon Slade Award
  • Best Australasian Orchid Species
    This plant would be eligible for nomination for the Hermon Slade Award

18.3. Classes

The classes in any show should be created considering the season i.e. what is likely to be in flower, and what your members grow.

  • Cymbidiums
    The major classes are:
    • Cymbidiums greater than 90mm
    • Cymbidiums greater than 60mm up to 90mm
    • Cymbidiums up to 60mm
    • Miniature Cymbidiums - we are now suggesting a class for Cymbidiums that are less than 60mm and are miniature in growth.
    These classes can be further broken down into colour classes
    • Red and Pink (also these can be separated)
    • Yellow and Green (also these can be separated)
    • White
    • Other colours or combination of colours
  • Paphiopedilums or Cypripedioideae
    (If you include Phragmipedium here, the class should be called Cypripedioideae)
    The major classes are:
    • Classical shape (this can be broken up with 2 or more of the following)
    • Predominately red
    • Predominately green
    • Predominately white
    • Predominately spotted
    • Other colours or combination of colours
    • Paphiopedilum including Parvisepalum
    • Maudiae shape (this can be broken up as follows)
    • Alba
    • Coloratum
    • Multifloral
    • Phragmipedium
    • Phrag. caudatum influence
    • Phrag. besseae influence
    • Phrag. pearcei influence
    • Other Cypripedioideae
    • Other
  • Laeliinae
    With the impending changes to nomenclature the current definition of Cattleya includes Cattleya , Sophronitis, Laelia and Brassavola , is becoming increasingly problematic. It is better to use 'exhibition shape'.The exhibition classes can be broken up into colour classes
    The major classes should be:
    • Exhibition shape greater than 120mm (or 110mm)
    • Lavender or mauve
    • White
    • Any other colour or combination of colours
    • Exhibition shape greater than 70mm and up to 120mm (or 110mm)
    • Lavender or mauve
    • Yellow or orange
    • Any other colour or combination of colours
    • Exhibition shape up to 70mm
    • Red or pink
    • Yellow or orange
    • Any other colour or combination of colours
    • Non-exhibition shape greater than 110mm
    • Non-exhibition shape greater than 70mm up to 110mm
    • Non- exhibition shape up to 70mm
    • Cluster minimum of 5 flowers
  • Oncidiinae Hybrids
    There will be a big shake up in Oncidiinae in the near future therefore there is a need for a rethink in this class.
    • Oncidium varicosum-crispum shapes
    • Oncidineae Odontoglossum crispum shapes
    • Oncidineae Brassia influence
    • Oncidineae Rhynchostele [Odontoglossum] bictonense influence
    • Tolumnia influence
    • Miltoniopsis
    • Other Oncidiinae
  • Dendrobium hybrids
    Section Dendrobium (soft cane type)
    • Predominately white
    • Predominately pink
    • Predominately mauve
    • Predominately yellow
    • Other colours
    Section Phalaenanthae type
    • Red / purple
    • white
    • Intermediate (between Phalaenanthe and Spathulata)
    Section Spathulata antelope types
    • Break down by colour or size
    • Section Callista
    • Dockrillia
    • Other Dendrobiums

Note: There is a trend to have one class for Dockrillia hybrids which helps in judging the classes - it does make a problem when judging the Champion Australian Orchid Hybrid. It is still recommended to include all Dockrillias in the one class.

  • Monopodial Hybrids
    • Vandaceous over 50mm
      • Vanda
        • Blue
        • Red
        • Other colours
      • Others
    • Vandaceous up to 50mm
      • Ascocenda
        • Blue
        • Red
        • Yellow
        • Other colours
      • Vascostylis
        • Blue
        • Other colours
      • Other vandaceous hybrids
    • Phalaenopsis (including Doritaenopsis)
    • Phalaenopsis classical shape (this class can be broken up into 2 or more of the following)
      • Phalaenopsis classical shape Greater than 75mm
        • White
        • Pink
        • Any other colour
      • Phalaenopsis classical shape greater than 50 mm up to 75mm
        • White
        • Pink
        • Yellow
        • Spotted
        • Any other colour
      • Phalaenopsis classical shape up to 50mm
        • White
        • Pink
        • Any other colour
      • Phalaenopsis non-classical shape Greater than 50 mm
        • White
        • Pink
        • Yellow
        • Spotted
        • Any other colour
      • Phalaenopsis non-classical shape up to 50mm
        • White
        • Pink
        • Any other colour
  • Miscellaneous
    This will include a variety of Genera depending on what your members grow. Here are some suggestions
    • Pleurothallidinae
      • Masdevallia 15mm and over
        • Red-Purple
        • Yellow
        • Other colours
      • Masdevallia up to 15mm
        • Red-Purple
        • Yellow
        • Other colours
      • Other Pleurothalidinae
    • Lycaste, Anguloa, Ida
    • Zygopedalum
    • Cataseatum
    • Any other
  • Exotic Species
    Species Classes can be
    • American Species
      • Phragmipedium
      • Laeliinae
      • Oncidiinae
      • Pleurothallidinae
      • Maxillaria
      • Cataseatum
      • Other
    • Asian Species
      • Paphiopedilum
        • Parvisepalum
        • Barbata
        • Brachypetalum
        • Paphiopedilum section
        • Other Paphiopedilums
      • Monopodial
      • Dendrobium
        • Dendrobium
        • Dockrillia
        • Other Dendrobinae
      • Bulbophyllinae
      • Other
    • Australasian excluding Australian
    • Other Areas

Note: There is a trend to have one class for Dockrillia species which helps in judging the classes - it does make a problem when judging the Champion Australian Orchid Species. It is still recommended to include all Dockrillias in the one class.

  • Australian Natives
    • Australian Native Hybrid
      • Dendrobium
        • Dendrobium over 50mm
          • White
          • Yellow
          • Other
        • Dendrobium up to 50mm
          • White
          • Yellow
          • Other
        • Other
      • Sarcochillus
        • Predominantly pink or red
        • Predominantly white
        • Predominantly spotted or patterned (pink red or white)
        • Any other colour
        • Intergeneric Sarcochilus hybrid
      • Terrestrial
      • Other
    • Australian Native Species
      • Dendrobium
        • Phalaenanthae
        • Den. speciosum
        • Den. kingianum
        • Other
      • Sarcochillus
      • Terrestrial
      • Other
  • Specimen
    You can include one Specimen class or one in each section. The minimum number of spikes/flowers depends on the genus.
  • Seedlings
    You can include one Seedling class or one in each section.

    It is permitted to have species seedlings

19. Conditions of Entry

  1. Initial results are tentative until all results are collated and finalised the following day.
  2. Entries are received upon the basis that the Society or its sponsors shall not be responsible for any loss, destruction nor damage to such exhibits and the exhibitor shall have no claim against the Society or Sponsors.
  3. Entries are accepted on condition that they are disease free. The decision of the Show Marshall shall be final.
  4. All competitive entries shall have been owned and in the possession of the exhibitor for the preceding six months. This rule does not apply to Ferns or Foliage Plants used in the displays.
  5. All competitive entries should be correctly and clearly labelled with the name of the plant.
  6. There shall be no restriction to the number of entries by an exhibitor in any class. Entries in joint names will be accepted.
  7. The Show Marshal and Committee reserves the right to reject, remove or rearrange any exhibit without giving any reason for that action and to reclassify any plant if necessary, prior to judging.
  8. All plants shall be booked in and in position ready for judging by . insert time and date......
  9. Entries are eligible for judging in one class only, except where stated otherwise in the schedule.
  10. If in the opinion of the Judges no exhibit in any class warrants a prize, none may be given. At the discretion of the Show Marshal additional classes may be created where warranted.
  11. Plants for special prizes shall be selected from all exhibits in the show unless otherwise specified.
  12. Judging shall be by a panel of Judges nominated by the O.S.N.S.W. Registrar and shall be in accordance with the standards and by-laws laid down by the O.S.N.S.W. Inc. The Judges decision shall be final.
  13. No exhibit may be dismantled or removed prior to closing time of the show at insert time and date......
  14. 'Novice' shall mean: Any exhibitor until she/he has won in aggregate first prize in any three genera or classes at any Orchid show or shows. The winning of the yearly point score in a monthly competition of any Society in any Genus/Class shall be deemed equivalent to a first prize in that Genus/Class. An exhibitor shall remain a Novice until the end of the calendar year in which the first prize for the third Genus/Glass was won. (you may wish to vary this)
  15. 'Seedling' shall mean the complete plant grown from seed and flowered for the first time. Plants that have been grown on or divided prior to being exhibited on the show bench are not eligible to be shown as seedlings. For exhibition purposes seedlings shall retain their status of 'Seedling' throughout the flowering season in which they first flower. Mericlones are not eligible as seedlings.
  16. 'Miniature species' are defined as Orchids with flowers 15mm or under in size across the widest part of the flower, regardless of the number of flowers, and distance of < 200mm from 1 st to last flower. All 'Miniature' species are to be judged in this class.
  17. 'Miniature Cymbidium Hybrids' are defined for the purpose of this schedule as Cymbidiums where the flowers are 55mm or less, to be measured horizontally across the visible limits of the flower without manipulation and are miniature in habit.
  18. 'Laeliinae Alliance' classes shall include all combinations and not only those hybrids with Cattleya in their parentage. E.g. Epidendrum, Sophronitis, Laelia, Hawkinsara, Cattleyatonia, Leptotes etc.
  19. Staking shall be in accordance with the rules of O.S.N.S.W. i.e. flowers may be supported in the best possible manner for presentation. This supporting should be in such a manner so as not to be obtrusive and distract from the overall beauty and charm of the plant. With single flowered genera e.g. Paphiopedilum, Lycaste, etc., ties or support shall be no higher than immediately below the ovary. If it is necessary to tie above the bottom flower or top branch, the judges are permitted to penalise, or temporarily remove such tie for the purpose of judging.
  20. The cover for plants under protection for humidity must be see through.
  21. Champion seedling is not to be considered for Grand Champion unless it has already won the Champion in its class.

 

 

14 Dec 2008